Everly Ryan

Historical Romance Author

"Bought and Paid For"

Coming Soon! Lover for Ransom by Debra Glass

"Bought and Paid For", "Debra Glass", "Ellora's Cave", "HIstorical Romance", "Scarlet Belles", "Scarlet Widow", "civil war romance", "erotic historical romance"Debra GlassComment

I’m excited to announce that I’ve contracted a new historical romance with Ellora’s Cave. Lover for Ransom will be released wherever EC books are sold Spring 2013. **whispering** Scarlet Belles containing Bought and Paid For and Scarlet Widow might also appear in print this Spring.

Lover for Ransom

Ransom Byrne has been ravaged with guilt ever since an illness rendered his little sister blind. The former Confederate cavalry officer has resolved to make amends by hiring a tutor from up North who’ll hopefully restore order to his sister’s life. After that’s accomplished, he’ll be free to leave Byrne’s End.

From the moment she steps off the train in Thompson’s Station, Tennessee, Cathleen Ryan makes a startling first impression. With her feminist ideas, the irrepressible Bostonian quickly outrages everyone—especially Ransom. At first glimpse he deems the bespectacled teacher too uptight and prim for his tastes. Appearances, however, are deceiving. She tenders decadent proposals that shock and intrigue him, and sultry nights spent submitting to his every illicit request offer them both love and redemption. But when her steadfast convictions attract the attention of dangerous men she risks losing her chance of ever becoming more than just a lover for Ransom.

Civil War Mourning Customs

"Bought and Paid For", "Civil War", "Debra Glass", "Ellora's Cave", "HIstorical Romance", "Rebel Rose", "Scarlet Widow", "civil war mourning customs", "civil war romance", "ellor", "mourning"Debra Glass3 Comments
weeping_veilDeath in the Victorian era was a complicated thing with complex rituals, and clothing. Strict protocols were observed that required mourners to wear certain items of clothing, colors, and to abstain from particular activities.
Today, we can scarcely imagine the rigid rules and rituals that were brought about by living conditions in the 19th century. Disease was rampant. Sterility was not understood. Diets, lack of vitamins, and nutrients resulted in illness and death. Doctors did not receive the medical training they do today and often, treatments consisted of blistering, bleeding, and poisonous herbal cures that sometimes resulted in fatalities. Germs and antibiotics were unheard of. Many died from simple cuts and childbirth claimed so many lives, that it was customary for a woman to make arrangements for the care of her child should she not survive.
Infections, pneumonia, TB, typhoid, malaria, yellow fever, small pox, and whooping cough could wipe out entire families. Remedies tended toward bizarre superstitions. Burning gun powder in sick rooms, sprinkling houses with vinegar, or placing an ax under the bed to “cut the pain in two” were common practices.
Superstition surrounded death, and in the American South, many of those customs survived into the twentieth century. Some of those beliefs included:
  • Covering Mirrors – During the 19th Century, most funerals were held in the home. Victorians believed that when there was a corpse in the house, all mirrors had to be covered with a black cloth. The Barton Upon Humber Family History Aid website explains that this ensured "that the soul of the departed would not get trapped behind the glass and be prevented from passing to 'the other side,'" Similar to the ancient superstitions, the Victorians also believed that "if you saw your own reflection in a room where someone had just died, then you would soon die yourself."
  • Stopping of Clocks – Pendulums on clocks were stopped at the hour of the deceased’s death to prevent the living family members from having bad luck. Victorians believed that when a person died, time stood still for them in the afterlife and a new period of existence began where the concept of time did not exist. To permit the clock to continue marking time was synonymous with inviting the spirit of the deceased to haunt the home. Stopping time allowed the deceased to ascend to heaven and eternity which is timeless.
  • Carrying the Body Out Feet First – The custom of removing a corpse from a home feet first was derived from the superstition that if removed head first, the deceased could look back into the home and beckon those remaining into death.
  • Photographs of the Deceased – All family photographs were sometimes turned face-down to prevent any of the close relatives and friends of the deceased from being possessed by the spirit of the dead.
  • Wearing Black - The wearing of black is a custom that has been observed for centuries. It was thought to make mourners draw less attention to themselves so that Death would not claim them as its next victim.
Socially, strict and elaborate dress and behavior codes were imposed, sometimes that lasted for several years. Mourning customs have been observed since the 1600s, but it wasn’t until the 1830s and 40s that bereavement became an art form. Scads of books were published on the proper course of mourning and Prince Albert’s death in 1861, and Queen Victoria’s mourning made the practice “fashionable.” Queen Victoria’s impact on mourning customs set the stage for the rest of Western Civilization. She continued wearing her "widow's weeds" until her death in 1901.
That same time period saw the onset of the American Civil War. At least 618,000 died or were killed during the Civil War. Some experts believe the actual death toll reached 700,000. According to Jane Peters Estes, an authority on death customs in Civil War-era America, in the state of Alabama alone, there were over 80,000 widows.
A Victorian woman donned what was known as "widow's weeds" within twenty-four hours of her husband's death. For a year and a day, she wore full mourning which consisted of dull black clothing trimmed with crepe, and a weeping veil.
Mourning women wore a veil in public to shield their tears from onlookers. Estes also stated that, “they believed that spirits of the departed would hover around those they loved. And if a passerby looked directly on the mourner's face, that spirit might attach itself to that person. So, the veil was a protection for the wearer as well as a protection for others.”
Mourning attire became some of the first store-bought clothing items during a time when most clothes were handmade at home. Death could come unexpectedly and the bereaved had to be prepared. Those who could not afford to buy ready-made items paid to have their own clothing dyed or dyed it themselves at home, in the back yard because of the dye's pungent odor. An 1864 diary from Virginia related 'the entire town smells of the dye pots.”
Men wore black or dark colored suits to a funeral and black or white silk hat bands, depending on who had died. If the deceased was a young girl, white silk was worn. They donned a black armband for a few months to a year as a sign of respect. Widowers were permitted to remarry after the wearing of the armband.
Women observed three stages of mourning:  heavy/deep mourning, full mourning, and half mourning.
Mourning observations lasted different lengths depending on the deceased:
  • Spouse: One to 2 1/2 years
  • Parent: 6 months to a year
  • Children over 10 yrs old: 6 months to a year
  • Children under 10 yrs: 3 to 6 months
  • Infants: 6 weeks and up
  • Siblings: 6 to 8 months
  • Aunts and uncles: 3 to 6 months
  • Cousins: 6 weeks to 3 months
  • Aunts or uncles related by marriage: 6 weeks to 3 months
  • Grandparents: 6 months
  • Distant relatives and friends: 3 weeks and up
Deep mourning lasted a minimum of a year and a day but could extend as long as 2 ½ years, in which black clothing, jewelry, veils, bonnets, outer wear, and crepe were worn exclusively. Bonnets and outer wear were covered in crepe for a year and a day, and could after that time be removed. Often the dyes used to color the crepe would run when wet, thus widows did not venture far from home. Mourning fabric was somewhat shiny. Much work went into keeping the black from fading. Among the ingredients used were: ox gall, fuller’s earth, and even egg yolks. Heavy mourning collars and cuffs were black, and marking the second year, a woman could add lace. Hats were forbidden for mourning and instead crepe covered bonnets were worn. Long veils were worn the first year and shortened by the second. Very little, or no adornment was worn.
Underclothes remained the standard of the time, but a black band was sewn to the hem of the outermost petticoat in the event it became visible. Jewelry was not worn for the first few months and thereafter, jet jewelry was permitted. Black glass and India rubber was also used to make mourning jewelry which consisted of rings, broaches, bracelets, lockets, and earrings. Mourning rings served as keepsakes and were provided by the deceased’s family.
During full mourning, gold, silver, jet, pearls, and other stones could be worn. White collars and cuffs replaced black crepe.
Half mourning colors included various somber colors of lilac, lavender, violet, mauve, and gray. Bonnets were also allowed in these colors as well as straw hats.
Time periods were observed where a widow was not permitted to leave her home or receive visitors. After that time, she distributed black edged calling cards to let friends and family know her heavy mourning was over and she could receive visitors. Those in mourning were not allowed to attend parties, weddings, or other social events.
It was considered unlucky to throw one’s mourning attire away after the mourning period was over. The clothes were put away and kept should they be needed again.
Author Sally Painter offers another mourning tradition of the time. “My grandmother had several death announcements that were used before and during this era. They were made out of very thick cardstock that was about 1/8" thick, maybe a bit thicker. The background was black with gold print and a gold ribbon border. Usually a gold cross was centered at the top, but these varied in design.  Included on the card were the name of the deceased, date of birth and death and details about the funeral arrangements. A messenger (usually a young boy) was sent from house to house with the announcement for people to read and then return to him so he could carry it to the next house.”
People during this time feared they would not be mourned properly.
A practice that seems macabre in the modern era is post mortem photography which became popular during the 1860’s. Burial was often delayed for days or weeks waiting for the photographer to arrive. Often this was the only photographic image a family had of a person. Sometimes, these images included painted-on clouds to indicate the picture is of a deceased person. Wreaths of hair from the deceased, called mourning wreathes, were crocheted and laid by the portraits.
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Widows would often use black bed linens. They were not permitted to marry for at least a year, the thinking being that it took a year for the complete decay of deceased husband.
Older widows tended to mourn longer than their younger counterparts.
To this day, many women consider it disrespectful to wear anything other than black to a funeral or memorial service.
Widows serve as characters in several of my historical romance novels set during the Civil War.

 

Scarlet Widow

scarletwidow_msr Tough…or tender? If she follows her heart, she won’t have to choose.
Molly has forever lusted for all three Barksdale brothers, but could never choose. Instead, scandal chose for her, and she married the youngest of the three. Then the brothers go to war, and Molly finds herself a grieving widow when her husband is murdered by a merciless band of Union soldiers.
Hardin Barksdale is hell-bent on avenging his brother. Greer Barksdale is honor-bound to protect his home. They both want Molly—and this time, they’re willing to share. The temptation is seductive, the passion sizzling. In harsh, post-war Tennessee, their nightly forbidden trysts wield the power to heal them all—if they can escape the twisted desires of a man bent on seeing all three of them dead.
Digital Ebook
 

Bought and Paid For


Unable to support herself and her beloved servants, Widow Carrie Hatcher contemplates the unthinkable—offering her services for money. Forced to board wounded Colonel Wesley McEwen, Carrie vows to make the striking Confederate soldier her first “client”.
But Carrie gets more than she bargained for when she agrees to comply with Wesley’s every illicit request for one week. Throughout long, sultry nights, Wesley tutors Carrie in every position, every skill, of her illicit new trade. From dark taboos to pleasurable punishments, Carrie becomes his willing pupil. Passions inflamed, the couple becomes more scandalously intimate but Carrie realizes she wants to give him far more than just her body. The colonel, however, may be too haunted by his past to risk accepting more than he’s bought and paid for.
Digital Edition
 

Rebel Rose


They say she’s a Rebel spy…
Widow, Rosalie O’Kelley, is not above using her feminine wiles to secure much needed supplies for her fellow townspeople. But when Union Colonel Eric Skaarsberg is put in charge, Rose’s usual tactics fail miserably. In exchange for supplies, she comes to a scandalous arrangement with him. She agrees to become his willing plaything—to fulfill his every physical need…eagerly and without hesitation.
Eric Skaarsberg is duty bound to ferret out the spy who has been leaking information to the Confederates. All evidence points to the passionate belle who readily responds to every touch and taste he metes out to her. One by one, he strips away Rose’s secrets, but Eric is not satisfied with owning the she-Rebel’s luscious body. At any cost, he must uncover her vulnerable and perilous past—even if it means the destruction of them both.
Digital Edition









































Commemorate the 150th Anniversary of the Civil War With a Historical Romance by Debra Glass

"Bought and Paid For", "Civil War", "Debra Glass", "Gone With the Wind", "Haunted", "Rebel Rose", "Scarlet Widow", "civil war 150th anniversary", "civil war romance"Debra GlassComment

The American Civil War celebrates its sesquicentennial in 2012. Those turbulent years between 1862 and 1865 were a defining moment in our nation’s history. While the Revolutionary War created the United States, the Civil War determined what sort of nation the US would be. The Civil War answered two fundamental questions: Was the United States a confederation of sovereign states or an indivisible nation with a strong national government? And; Would a nation, founded on a declaration that all men were created equal continue to operate as the largest slaveholding country in the world?

Union victory in 1865, preserved the United States as one nation and abolished the institution of slavery. This win came at the cost of 625,000 lives.

In 1936, when Margaret Mitchell’s sweeping novel, Gone With the Wind, set during the American Civil War, was published, a worldwide love affair with historical, romantic fiction was born.

Visiting Margaret Mitchell's House in Atlanta

Visiting the Atlanta house where Margaret Mitchell wrote Gone With the Wind

As a southerner, I grew up around the relics of those once grand plantation homes, amidst historic markers detailing skirmishes and Hood’s march toward the ill-fated battles of Franklin and Nashville. I heard stories from my great-grandparents about their parents who fought on both sides. I attended college in the South and graduated with an MAed with emphasis in – what else? – history!

My interest in history has always colored my writing. From my locally popular Skeletons in the Closet ghost story collections, to numerous articles for Fate Magazine, and varied Civil War history magazines, to my romantic fiction, the Civil War continues to inspire me.

When I began writing romance, it was no wonder I most often turned to the Civil War for my historical settings.

Here’s what reviewers are saying about my Civil War romances:

“Ms. Glass did an outstanding job of recreating the old South with heart-wrenching visual images of what was going on in and around war ravaged Georgia. Marietta is a perfect backdrop to represent the suffering endured by both soldiers and citizens. It is symbolic of the war torn states as well as the war torn hero and heroine.” ~ Long and Short Reviews

“The strength of Ms. Glass’s writing draws the reader into her deeply emotional and moving love stories time and time again. By intertwining passion and history overlaid with a great depth of emotion and laced with a relentless increasing level of sensuality between Greer, Molly and Hardin the reader is treated to dark and utterly seductive story that pulls-at-the-heartstrings!  Set during the Civil War, Scarlet Widow gives the reader a gripping, detailed and vividly descriptive look at the heartache, hardships and cruelties of war, Molly and the Barksdale brothers experienced that forever changed their lives.  The historically filled pages are brimming with tension, hope and courage, richly portrayed in such a way that the reader will have a difficult time putting this story down. ” ~ The Romance Studio

“Ms. Glass does a beautiful job of bringing the harshness of the Civil War to life in Florence, Alabama. I found this especially interesting since Alabama is seldom used as a plot setting for a civil war romance. The history … illustrated the awful external and internal conflicts Rose and Eric were facing.” ~ Long and Short Reviews

“I love Glass's erotic romances because they're magnificently written and they're often so much "more" than erotic romance. I love her Civil War/Reconstruction fiction because she loves her subject and loves her readers enough to tell them honest, gritty stories with characterizations and issues genuine to that time. Glass immerses readers into culture, society, and events with delectable word pictures and action. Sensory details and exquisite world-building transport willing readers to the realities of a lost time.” ~ MA Goodreads

Revisit the Civil War with one of my books!

Gatekeeper

Book one in the Phantom Lovers series.
Evil shadow ghosts known as soul collectors haunted her childhood nightmares, so Nashville PD criminal profiler Jillian Drew did everything possible to turn her back on her psychic abilities. But now her eccentric sister has been abducted and nothing in her criminology background has prepared Jillian for that tragedy — or for Benton Smith, the powerful and devastatingly attractive ghost of a Civil War officer and the only witness to Amy's abduction.
Fearful of the brazen specter, Jillian nevertheless needs him. Benton is her Gatekeeper, a spirit sworn to protect her from the soul collectors, who attack each time she unleashes her long-dormant psychic senses in an attempt to find her sister.
Yet she must somehow keep the devilishly seductive spirit at arm's length, for Benton's soul is at stake — and succumbing to his desires could have dangerous consequences for them both.

 

Bought and Paid For

Unable to support herself and her beloved servants, Widow Carrie Hatcher contemplates the unthinkable—offering her services for money. Forced to board wounded Colonel Wesley McEwen in her home, Carrie vows to make the striking Confederate soldier her first “client”.

But Carrie gets more than she bargained for when she agrees to comply with Wesley’s every illicit request for one week. Throughout long, sultry nights, Wesley tutors Carrie in every position, every skill, of her illicit new trade. From dark taboos to pleasurable punishments, Carrie becomes his willing pupil.

Passions inflamed, the couple becomes more scandalously intimate but Carrie realizes she wants to give him far more than just her body. The colonel, however, may be too haunted by his past to risk accepting more than he’s bought and paid for.

 

Rebel Rose

They say she’s a Rebel spy…

Rosalie O’Kelley is not above using her feminine wiles to secure much-needed supplies for her fellow townspeople. But when Union Colonel Eric Skaarsberg is put in charge, Rose’s usual tactics fail miserably. In exchange for supplies, she comes to a scandalous arrangement with him. She agrees to become his willing plaything—to fulfill his every physical need, eagerly and without hesitation.

Eric is duty-bound to ferret out the spy who has been leaking information to the Confederates. All evidence points to the passionate belle who readily responds to every touch and taste he metes out. One by one, he strips away Rose’s secrets, but Eric is not satisfied with owning the she-Rebel’s luscious body. He must uncover the truth of her past at any cost—even if it means the destruction of them both.

 

Scarlet Widow

Tough…or tender? If she follows her heart, she won’t have to choose.

Molly has forever lusted for all three Barksdale brothers, but could never choose. Instead, scandal chose for her, and she married the youngest of the three. Then the brothers go to war, and Molly finds herself a grieving widow when her husband is murdered by a merciless band of Union soldiers.

Hardin Barksdale is hell-bent on avenging his brother. Greer Barksdale is honor-bound to protect his home. They both want Molly—and this time, they’re willing to share. The temptation is seductive, the passion sizzling. In harsh, post-war Tennessee, their nightly forbidden trysts wield the power to heal them all—if they can escape the twisted desires of a man bent on seeing all three of them dead.

 

Haunted

Can a heart still love once it stops beating?

My hopes of having a normal life died when I did. Especially since my near death experience turned me into a clairvoyant with a disfiguring scar. Not exactly most-popular material.

Now, because of me, my whole family has been forced to move to some small town in Tennessee. My parents think a quiet new school and a new set of friends will heal me of the scars I carry both inside and out.

There’s just one problem. I’m being haunted by Jeremiah Ransom, the charming ghost of a Civil War soldier who lived and died in my house. His presence makes me feel perfect. As if there’d never been a wound in the first place.

But I’m afraid that loving him will result in my death all over again.

 

Skeletons of the Civil War

Ghostly legends abound wherever history has made its mark. Skeletons of the Civil War follows the ghosts of the Army of Tennessee from the bloody Battle of Shiloh to its decimation on the killing fields of Franklin. Combining the craft of a story-teller (Glass), with the expert knowledge of a military historian (Mathews), the stories in this book are packed with archival photographs and intriguing first-hand accounts. Read fresh, spine-tingling accounts of a headless horseman who gallops through the eerie cedar glades at Stones River, the tale of the regiment which earned the nickname The Bloody Ninth at Shiloh, the phantom regiment at Resaca, the spirit of Tennessee’s dashing Boy General, who followed a woman home, the mysterious empty graves near the Hazen monument, weirdness at The Dead Angle, true accounts of spirits who haunt the cavernous rooms of Tennessee’s grand plantation houses, the tragic tale of Captain Tod Carter who was shot down within sight of his home, and many more.

Haunted Mansions in the Heart of Dixie

There is something about an antebellum mansion that whispers ghost. From the rolling cotton fields of Colbert County, Alabama to the haunted hills of Tennessee, there is hardly a pre-Civil War dwelling that cannot boast of some resident spirit or similar unexplained phenomena.

Steeped in history, Haunted Mansions in the Heart of Dixie is a collection of true Southern haint tales set in the fertile Tennessee Valley. From the mysterious Bell Witch to the inexplicable events at Belle Mont Mansion, these tales recount some of the most infamous Southern hauntings of all time. Explore the dark history of Dixie with spirits who loved their homes so much that even in death they refuse to leave, and unearth other more diabolical specters hell-bent on the settling of old scores.


All the tales within are authentic. Proceed, therefore, into the haunted Heart of Dixie with caution. . .

My 2010 by Debra Glass

"Bad Kitty", "Badcock", "Bought and Paid For", "Debra Glass", "Julia London", "Lora Leigh", "Lover by Chance", "More Than a Mistress", "Phillipa Gregory", "Vicki Lewis Thompson"Debra GlassComment
2010 is over, but not without all those "best and worst of" lists.

My guilty pleasure is watching the Top 100 songs of 2010, any recap of the year show, even Junk in the Trunk with the Kardashians. So I've compiled a few lists of my own.

Standout Books I read in 2010

These are the books that stand out in my mind without even having to think about it. 2010 was the Year of Vicki Lewis Thompson and Lora Leigh for me. I met Vicki when she was the keynote speaker at the 2009 Heart of Dixie Romance Readers Luncheon and have been a fan ever since.

1. Wild and Hexy by Vicki Lewis Thompson
2. Blonde With a Wand by Vicki Lewis Thomspon
3. Highlander in Disguise by Julia London
4. Megan's Mark by Lora Leigh
5. Bengal's Heart by Lora Leigh
6. The Virgin's Lover, Phillipa Gregory


Favorite Gadgets

1. Western Elements External Hard Drive - Thanks O.G.! (guess what everyone got for Christmas in 2010)
2. Sony E Reader - I made more new friends from people who were curious about my E Reader!
3. My bluetooth - I love being hands free.

Favorite Music I Revisited Over and Over in 2010

1. Cruel Black Dove, Love My Way (Psychedelic Furs cover)
2. We Radiate, Goldfrapp
3. The whole Monster CD by Lady Gaga
4. Walking On Air, Kerli
5. 10,000 Miles, Mary Chapin Carpenter
6. Pulling Our Weight, The Radio Dept.

Works I Contracted and/or Published in 2010

1. Having Patience (June)
2. Badcock (July)
3. More Than a Mistress (August)
4. Rebel Rose (September)
5. Twice the Novice (October)
6. Lover by Chance (July)
7. Haunted (Due to be released April 2011)

My 2010 Highlights

1. Watching my youngest perform in 101 Dalmatians
2. Watching my oldest perform in Annie
3. Being nominated in the CAPAs for Bad Kitty and Bought and Paid For and for favorite author of 2009
4. Being a finalist in the Passionate Plume for Bad Kitty and Bought and Paid For
5. Seeing Mrs. O'Neal's ghost in broad daylight, along with a field trip of 64 school students on my Haunted History of the Shoals Ghost Walk Tour


My Worst of 2011 List

1. Sarah Palin's Alaska
2. Anything regarding Jon and Kate
3. The Gulf Oil Spill

My 2011 Wish List and Things to Anticipate

1. Growing as a writer
2. Attending at least one conference
3. Continuing to ignore the detractors
4. Read more
5. Season 4 of True Blood
6. William and Kate's Big British Wedding


So, what are a few things on your lists?

4.5 Star Review for Rebel Rose by Debra Glass

"Bought and Paid For", "Debra Glass", "Ellora's Cave", "HIstorical Romance", "Rebel Rose", "Scarlet Belles", "Two Lips Reviews", "civil war romance"Debra GlassComment
"Debra Glass has written an entertaining and gripping tale of love amidst the horrors of the Civil War. " ~ 4.5 Stars ~ Two Lips Reviews

They say she’s a Rebel spy…

Rosalie O’Kelley is not above using her feminine wiles to secure much-needed supplies for her fellow townspeople. But when Union Colonel Eric Skaarsberg is put in charge, Rose’s usual tactics fail miserably. In exchange for supplies, she comes to a scandalous arrangement with him. She agrees to become his willing plaything—to fulfill his every physical need, eagerly and without hesitation.

Eric is duty-bound to ferret out the spy who has been leaking information to the Confederates. All evidence points to the passionate belle who readily responds to every touch and taste he metes out. One by one, he strips away Rose’s secrets, but Eric is not satisfied with owning the she-Rebel’s luscious body. He must uncover the truth of her past at any cost—even if it means the destruction of them both.


* Coming 2011 from Ellora's Cave ~ Scarlet Belles ~ a print anthology including Rebel Rose and Bought and Paid For  *

September Contest - Win Bought and Paid For and Rebel Rose by Debra Glass

"Bought and Paid For", "Contest", "Debra Glass", "Ellora's Cave", "Rebel Rose"Debra Glass1 Comment
Enter to win free download copies of two of my Civil War stories, BOUGHT AND PAID FOR and my new release, REBEL ROSE!  Two lucky winners will get to spend some quality time with Confederate colonel and certified hunk Wesley McEwen, and sexy Union officer Eric Skaarsberg this fall.

Enter today!

Drawing will be held September 18. To enter, please fill out the following information.

Your name and information will never be given or sold to anyone outside of Debra's mailing list.

Rules:

* One contest entry per person.

* All winners will be contacted by email and will have 10 days to respond or an alternate winner will be selected.

* Entering the contest grants permission to list your name as the winner and to add you to Debra's mailing list.

* Current subscribers will automatically be entered in the drawing.

Bad Kitty and Bought and Paid For Final in the Passionate Plume Contest

"Bad Kitty", "Bought and Paid For", "Debra Glass", "HIstorical Romance", "Nashville", "Passionate Ink", "Passionate Plume", "Romance Writers of America"Debra GlassComment
Two of my historical romances, Bad Kitty and Bought and Paid For, were named as finalists in the Passionate Ink 5th annual The Passionate Plume contest. Winners will be announced at the "Naughty in Nashville" banquet, July 29, 2010, at the Opryland Resort in Nashville, Tennessee.

Complete list of finalists:

Passionate Ink’s 5th Annual The Passionate Plume Contest for Published Authors

The only published, all erotic romance award in RWA!

Five Sizzling Finalists in Five Categories:
(Two categories ended with a tie, resulting in six finalists for the Contemporary and Paranormal / Time Travel categories.)
Contemporary
Jenna Bayley-Burke* – Compromising Positions
Jianne Carlo* – A Paratrooper in A Pear Tree
Kelly Jamieson* – Rigger
Opal Carew* – SECRET TIES
Opal Carew* – SIX
Qwillia Rain* – Diablo Blanco Club: Unfair Advantage
Historical
Emma Wildes – Can’t Say No
Debra Glass* – Bad Kitty
Debra Glass* – Bought and Paid For
Francesca Hawley* – Seeking Truth
Kate Pearce* – Simply Wicked
Futuristic /Sci Fi/Fantasy
Allyson James – Calder
Anna Leigh Keaton* – Once Upon a Time… Midnight Hour
Anna Leigh Keaton* – Woodland Magic – Fated
Jory Strong* – Fallon Mates : Zoe’s Gift
Michelle Polaris* – Bound Odyssey
Paranormal / Time Travel
Allyson James – Mortal Seductions
Allyson James – Mortal Temptations
Anna Leigh Keaton* – Time and Again
Dana Marie Bell* – Dare to Believe
Francesca Hawley* – Protect and Defend
Sharon Page* – Blood Deep
Novella
Anna Leigh Keaton* – Inferno
Jayne Rylon – Phoenix Incantation
Liza James* – Hot For Teacher
Madelynne Ellis* – Pure Folly
Sherry James – Eight Seconds (Flavors of Ecstasy Anthology Vol. 3)
* indicates the author is a member of the Passionate Ink Chapter
**If you have any questions, email Karen Steele at pp5@passionateink.org



Click the titles for more information, to read a blurb, excerpt, or to buy Bad Kitty and Bought and Paid For.

4.5 Review for Bought and Paid For by Debra Glass

"Bought and Paid For", "Debra Glass", "HIstorical Romance", "Whipped Cream Reviews"Debra GlassComment


Bought and Paid For by Debra Glass is "a fantastic and erotic journey from beginning to end. I give this beautiful and heart wrenching story 4.5 solid cherries!" ~ Whipped Cream Reviews. To read the entire review, click HERE

Bought and Paid For

Unable to support herself and her beloved servants, Widow Carrie Hatcher contemplates the unthinkable—offering her services for money. Forced to board wounded Colonel Wesley McEwen in her home, Carrie vows to make the striking Confederate soldier her first “client”.

But Carrie gets more than she bargained for when she agrees to comply with Wesley’s every illicit request for one week. Throughout long, sultry nights, Wesley tutors Carrie in every position, every skill, of her illicit new trade. From dark taboos to pleasurable punishments, Carrie becomes his willing pupil.

Passions inflamed, the couple becomes more scandalously intimate but Carrie realizes she wants to give him far more than just her body. The colonel, however, may be too haunted by his past to risk accepting more than he’s bought and paid for.

To read and excerpt or buy Bought and Paid For from Ellora's Cave, click HERE

To buy Bought and Paid For for Kindle, click HERE

History for the Taking with Favorite Erotic Author and Favorite Erotic Historical Nom Debra Glass

"Bad Kitty", "Bought and Paid For", "Debra Glass", "Ellora's Cave", "The Romance Studio"Debra GlassComment

Click HERE to read History for the Taking with Debra Glass, 2009 TRS Favorite Erotic Author and two-time Favorite Erotic Historical nominee.

Book Dedications by Debra Glass

"Book dedication", "Bought and Paid For", "Debra Glass", "Elissa Wilds", "Heath Mathews"Debra Glass15 Comments
Dedicating a book seemed simple to me at first. I thought of my elementary school friend, Karen, who co-wrote countless tales with me from 5th grade on, the historical figures who've inspired my stories, and especially my adorable and supportive husband, Timm, without whose support, I wouldn't be doing this.

Stephen King said a writer who dedicates a book to a spouse has a spouse who "gets it." Timm may not have a handle on the intricacies of the publishing world but he definitely gets it. :-) (not to mention his invaluable help in the research and development department.)

I was touched that I could dedicate my 2009 CAPA Nominee, Bought and Paid For, to my feisty romance reading granny who learned I'd dedicated the book to her a few days before she passed away last year.

I've dedicated a book to my forum family, The Black Sheep. I've dedicated books to friends who've helped me with story ideas and research - Heath Mathews, one of my best friends and a cracker-jack military historian, and Elissa and Amy who helped me tremendously with my Wiccan heroine in Watchkeeper.

I'm even one of those lucky writers who has a dedication worthy editor, or two, or three. The help and support of an editor who understands and believes in what you're doing, will really make your stories shine.

And there are those friends who have dedications to come! (I've just been waiting for the perfect book for you, Stormy. How about Rebel Rose? Crossing my fingers here for a contract, soon.)

At first, I thought dedicating a book would be easy. It's not.

Who inspires you? To whom would you (or have you) dedicate(d) a book?