Everly Ryan

Historical Romance Author

"Debra Glass"

Don't Miss the Alabama Book Festival, April 20, 2013!

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Join Debra and members of the Heart of Dixie and Southern Magic Romance Writers of America chapters who'll be signing books and greeting readers at the annual Alabama Book Festival, Saturday, April 20, 2013. For more information, click HERE.

Available Now! Lover for Ransom by Debra Glass

"Civil War", "Debra Glass", "Ellora's Cave", "HIstorical Romance", "Kerry Freeman", "Romance Magicians", "Silken Sheets Blog", "Susana's Parlour", "civil war 150th anniversary", "civil war research", "civil war romance"Debra GlassComment

Release day has arrived! My new historical, Lover for Ransom, is available at Ellora’s Cave in all eReader formats. To celebrate, I’m blogging today, (March 20) with Kerry Freeman HERE and March 21, on Susana’s Parlour HERE. On March 22, I’ll be guest blogging on Silken Sheets and my Romance Writers of America chapter, Southern Magic’s Romance Magicians Blog. There’ll be chances to win a free download, character interviews, author interviews, and some tidbits about where I got my inspiration for my hero and heroine, oh, and my favorite secondary character in Lover for Ransom, an attitudinal horse named String Bean.

loverforransom_msrBlurb -

Lover for Ransom

Debra Glass

Ransom Byrne has been ravaged by guilt since an illness rendered his little sister blind. The former Confederate cavalry officer has resolved to make amends by hiring a Yankee tutor who’ll hopefully restore order to his sister’s life. Once that’s accomplished, he’ll be free to leave Byrne’s End.

From the moment she steps off the train in Tennessee, Cathleen Ryan makes a startling first impression. With her feminist ideas, the irrepressible Bostonian quickly outrages everyone—especially Ransom. He deems the bespectacled teacher too uptight and prim for his tastes. Appearances, however, are deceiving. She tenders decadent proposals that shock and intrigue him, and sultry nights spent submitting to his every illicit request offer them both love and redemption.

But when her steadfast convictions attract the attention of dangerous men, Cathleen risks losing her chance of becoming more than just a lover for Ransom.

Inside Scoop: This nineteenth-century tale contains mild violence, spanking, sloppy puppy kisses, more spanking, fiery suffragette speeches and an attitudinal horse named String Bean.

A Romantica® historical erotic romance from Ellora’s Cave

 

Click HERE to buy Lover for Ransom in all eReader format at Ellora’s Cave today!

Excerpt -

An Excerpt From: LOVER FOR RANSOM

Copyright © DEBRA GLASS, 2013

All Rights Reserved, Ellora's Cave Publishing, Inc.

“Don’t you ever read anything for pleasure?”

She toyed with the earpieces of her glasses, her mind fixed on the way his velvety drawl had played havoc with the word pleasure. She cleared her throat. “There are far too many important things to read to waste my poor eyesight on frivolities, Mr. Byrne.”

He closed her book, set it on the table and stood. Cathleen flinched as his leg brushed hers when he passed on his way to the bookcase. He opened it and pressed his fingertip to his lips in thought as he perused its contents.

Cathleen studied his casual stance. His weight shifted to one leg and his head cocked to the side. He looked back at her, stared so long it made her insides quiver and then turned back to the collection and removed a slender book from the shelf.

“I shall read to you then,” he said with a smile and he returned to his chair. “To protect your poor eyesight from…frivolities.”

Cathleen gulped as his long fingers opened the book and he thumbed through the pages. It looked like a child’s volume in his hands and she couldn’t help but wonder what he’d chosen.

“Ah, here,” he said, placing his elbow casually on the armrest of his chair to hold the book at a comfortable height. “It was many and many a year ago, in a kingdom by the sea, that a maiden lived there that you may know by the name of Annabel Lee.”

Edgar Allan Poe. Of course she was familiar with the famed Baltimore author. But she’d read his works in braille, and certainly had never heard them read aloud by a man with such a hauntingly husky voice. This night—this moment, with the clock’s pendulum ticking off the seconds in time with the poem’s meter and the flickering glow of the lamp—seemed to be made for the dark, beautifully macabre poem about a woman who’d died before her time.

“For the moon never beams without bringing me dreams of the beautiful Annabel Lee,” Ransom continued.

Cathleen closed her eyes, picturing a pair of young lovers walking hand in hand on a stormy beach. Ransom’s voice transported her and she felt the anguish of the author who’d lost his love only to find himself frequented by her ghost.

“And so, all the night-tide, I lie down by the side, of my darling—my darling—my life and my bride, in the sepulcher there by the sea, in her tomb by the sounding sea.”

Eyes still closed, Cathleen sat in the stillness, absorbing the song contained in the words. When her lashes fluttered open, she was surprised at the tear that traced down her cheek. Blushing, she swept it away. “Very nice, Mr. Byrne.”

He raised his eyebrows in mock warning.

She giggled. She actually giggled. Closing her eyes for a split second, she struggled to compose herself. She was acting like a bashful schoolgirl. “Ransom,” she corrected, her voice but a breath.

In that instant, something had suddenly changed between them and she was at a loss to decipher it.

Staring, he inhaled. “With your hair loose, you reminded me of the woman in that poem.”

Her eyes widened. “Dead?”

He chuckled without mirth. “No. Wild and windswept.”

This time, Cathleen did begin to smooth her hair down.

“No,” he said. “No. Don’t touch it. It’s perfect the way it is.” He must have realized he’d said too much. “I mean, it’s only you and me. There’s no need for pretense.”

Cathleen nodded. Her gaze fell to the brown leather covered book in his hand. “Do you believe such love exists?”

He snorted and closed the book. “This was the fancy of a man who imbibed too much and who thought too much. Love like that is for the young and foolish—for people who haven’t experienced the things I have.”

Cathleen gnawed her bottom lip. “Are you referring to your time during the war?”

He suddenly looked uncomfortable. His big and masculine exterior seemed incongruous with his sudden unease. “Yeah,” he admitted. “I saw and did things no living human being should ever have to see or do. Things that’ll make you hate yourself.”

Cathleen didn’t know how to respond. Newspapers told of the hardships and combat. She’d seen soldiers boarding trains to join the fighting. She’d watched neighbors don their widow’s weeds. She herself had received a telegram informing her that her brother had been killed. But even when the war had come into her very home, it had always seemed a distant thing. But these Tennesseans had lived the war. This man had fought it. Federal troops had occupied their home. While on the train, she’d overheard tales about frightening guerilla raids from both sides, about men who didn’t live by any code of decency, who took what they wanted and killed indiscriminately. These families had lived day to day, wondering if their hard-earned food stores, their homes or even their very lives would be taken from them.

“No,” Ransom continued. “The war was anything but glory.”

Still, Cathleen remained uncharacteristically silent. While she pitied the plight of these people, in her eyes, the war had been a necessary evil, a vehicle through which an entire race had broken the bonds of slavery and declared themselves free. And yet, she didn’t feel free to admit her thoughts on the matter to Ransom Byrne. Not tonight.

“What about you, Cathleen?” he asked, his gaze finding and holding hers, daring her to correct him. “Do you believe in that kind of love?” His tone was almost mocking.

Realizing he’d shifted the conversation back to the poem, she let out a laugh. “Of course not. In fact, I don’t agree with marriage at all and I shall never marry.”

“How did you come to this conclusion?”

“Contrary to what you might think, I haven’t chosen a life of spinsterhood because I am bookish and outspoken, not to mention plain.” She straightened, confused at the way a belief she’d always maintained with pride, now hurt. “No. I simply do not accept as true that a woman should have to marry and live out her days in subjugation.”

“Subjugation?” he asked and then laughed. “I’ve always thought that was the other way around. All the married men I know are pretty beholden to their wives.”

“That’s but a puerile joke. We all know that marriage gives husbands rights to a woman’s livelihood and even her body, if he so chooses to claim them. For a woman, marriage is nothing but legalized…rape.”

This time, both his eyebrows shot up. “That’s a mighty strong word.”

“A married man can demand his rights anytime he chooses. Therefore, if a woman is forced into coitus with him, it is legalized rape.” Cathleen lifted her chin, awaiting an argument. It was a strong word. But he needed to know how she felt about subjugation. She needed him to know it.

Instead, he surprised her. “Don’t you ever feel desire?”

Yes, I’m feeling it this very instant.

Lover for Ransom–Available March 20, 2013

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loverforransom_msr

Lover for Ransom

Debra Glass
Ransom Byrne has been ravaged by guilt since an illness rendered his little sister blind. The former Confederate cavalry officer has resolved to make amends by hiring a Yankee tutor who’ll hopefully restore order to his sister’s life. Once accomplished, he’ll be free to leave Byrne’s End.
From the moment she steps off the train in Tennessee, Cathleen Ryan makes a startling first impression. With her feminist ideas, the irrepressible Bostonian quickly outrages everyone—especially Ransom. He deems the bespectacled teacher too uptight and prim for his tastes. Appearances, however, are deceiving. She tenders decadent proposals that shock and intrigue him, and sultry nights spent submitting to his every illicit request offer them both love and redemption.
But when her steadfast convictions attract the attention of dangerous men, Cathleen risks losing her chance of becoming more than just a lover for Ransom.
A Romantica® historical erotic romance from Ellora’s Cave
Buy Ebook March 20
Excerpt ~
An Excerpt From: LOVER FOR RANSOM
Copyright © DEBRA GLASS, 2013
All Rights Reserved, Ellora's Cave Publishing, Inc.
“Don’t you ever read anything for pleasure?”
She toyed with the earpieces of her glasses, her mind fixed on the way his velvety drawl had played havoc with the word pleasure. She cleared her throat. “There are far too many important things to read to waste my poor eyesight on frivolities, Mr. Byrne.”
He closed her book, set it on the table and stood. Cathleen flinched as his leg brushed hers when he passed on his way to the bookcase. He opened it and pressed his fingertip to his lips in thought as he perused its contents.
Cathleen studied his casual stance. His weight shifted to one leg and his head cocked to the side. He looked back at her, stared so long it made her insides quiver and then turned back to the collection and removed a slender book from the shelf.
“I shall read to you then,” he said with a smile and he returned to his chair. “To protect your poor eyesight from…frivolities.”
Cathleen gulped as his long fingers opened the book and he thumbed through the pages. It looked like a child’s volume in his hands and she couldn’t help but wonder what he’d chosen.
“Ah, here,” he said, placing his elbow casually on the armrest of his chair to hold the book at a comfortable height. “It was many and many a year ago, in a kingdom by the sea, that a maiden lived there that you may know by the name of Annabel Lee.”
Edgar Allan Poe. Of course she was familiar with the famed Baltimore author. But she’d read his works in braille, and certainly had never heard them read aloud by a man with such a hauntingly husky voice. This night—this moment, with the clock’s pendulum ticking off the seconds in time with the poem’s meter and the flickering glow of the lamp—seemed to be made for the dark, beautifully macabre poem about a woman who’d died before her time.
“For the moon never beams without bringing me dreams of the beautiful Annabel Lee,” Ransom continued.
Cathleen closed her eyes, picturing a pair of young lovers walking hand in hand on a stormy beach. Ransom’s voice transported her and she felt the anguish of the author who’d lost his love only to find himself frequented by her ghost.
“And so, all the night-tide, I lie down by the side, of my darling—my darling—my life and my bride, in the sepulcher there by the sea, in her tomb by the sounding sea.”
Eyes still closed, Cathleen sat in the stillness, absorbing the song contained in the words. When her lashes fluttered open, she was surprised at the tear that traced down her cheek. Blushing, she swept it away. “Very nice, Mr. Byrne.”
He raised his eyebrows in mock warning.
She giggled. She actually giggled. Closing her eyes for a split second, she struggled to compose herself. She was acting like a bashful schoolgirl. “Ransom,” she corrected, her voice but a breath.
In that instant, something had suddenly changed between them and she was at a loss to decipher it.
Staring, he inhaled. “With your hair loose, you reminded me of the woman in that poem.”
Her eyes widened. “Dead?”
He chuckled without mirth. “No. Wild and windswept.”
This time, Cathleen did begin to smooth her hair down.
“No,” he said. “No. Don’t touch it. It’s perfect the way it is.” He must have realized he’d said too much. “I mean, it’s only you and me. There’s no need for pretense.”
Cathleen nodded. Her gaze fell to the brown leather covered book in his hand. “Do you believe such love exists?”
He snorted and closed the book. “This was the fancy of a man who imbibed too much and who thought too much. Love like that is for the young and foolish—for people who haven’t experienced the things I have.”
Cathleen gnawed her bottom lip. “Are you referring to your time during the war?”
He suddenly looked uncomfortable. His big and masculine exterior seemed incongruous with his sudden unease. “Yeah,” he admitted. “I saw and did things no living human being should ever have to see or do. Things that’ll make you hate yourself.”
Cathleen didn’t know how to respond. Newspapers told of the hardships and combat. She’d seen soldiers boarding trains to join the fighting. She’d watched neighbors don their widow’s weeds. She herself had received a telegram informing her that her brother had been killed. But even when the war had come into her very home, it had always seemed a distant thing. But these Tennesseans had lived the war. This man had fought it. Federal troops had occupied their home. While on the train, she’d overheard tales about frightening guerilla raids from both sides, about men who didn’t live by any code of decency, who took what they wanted and killed indiscriminately. These families had lived day to day, wondering if their hard-earned food stores, their homes or even their very lives would be taken from them.
“No,” Ransom continued. “The war was anything but glory.”
Still, Cathleen remained uncharacteristically silent. While she pitied the plight of these people, in her eyes, the war had been a necessary evil, a vehicle through which an entire race had broken the bonds of slavery and declared themselves free. And yet, she didn’t feel free to admit her thoughts on the matter to Ransom Byrne. Not tonight.
“What about you, Cathleen?” he asked, his gaze finding and holding hers, daring her to correct him. “Do you believe in that kind of love?” His tone was almost mocking.
Realizing he’d shifted the conversation back to the poem, she let out a laugh. “Of course not. In fact, I don’t agree with marriage at all and I shall never marry.”
“How did you come to this conclusion?”
“Contrary to what you might think, I haven’t chosen a life of spinsterhood because I am bookish and outspoken, not to mention plain.” She straightened, confused at the way a belief she’d always maintained with pride, now hurt. “No. I simply do not accept as true that a woman should have to marry and live out her days in subjugation.”
“Subjugation?” he asked and then laughed. “I’ve always thought that was the other way around. All the married men I know are pretty beholden to their wives.”
“That’s but a puerile joke. We all know that marriage gives husbands rights to a woman’s livelihood and even her body, if he so chooses to claim them. For a woman, marriage is nothing but legalized…rape.”
This time, both his eyebrows shot up. “That’s a mighty strong word.”
“A married man can demand his rights anytime he chooses. Therefore, if a woman is forced into coitus with him, it is legalized rape.” Cathleen lifted her chin, awaiting an argument. It was a strong word. But he needed to know how she felt about subjugation. She needed him to know it.
Instead, he surprised her. “Don’t you ever feel desire?”
Yes, I’m feeling it this very instant.

Happy Birthday to my Favorite Hero–Thomas Benton Smith

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"First romance, first love, is something so special to all of us, both emotionally and physically, that it touches our lives and enriches them forever." ~ Rosemary Rogers
 
Gatekeeper featured Benton Smith, the ghostly hero in my first published romance and first Phantom Lovers series book. The character of Benton Smith was based on the real Thomas Benton Smith who was born in 1838, near Triune, Tennessee. Smith, who showed promise as an inventor, attended Western Military Institute in Nashville, and when his state seceded from the Union, he enlisted in Company B of the 20th Tennessee Infantry. His cool head in battle and sharp intelligence propelled him higher in rank until he was commissioned Brigadier General of the 20th TN Infantry – making him the youngest brigadier in the Army of Tennessee. Sadly, Smith was struck down in a cowardly attack by Union Colonel Wm. L. McMillen, after Smith surrendered at the Battle of Nashville. Smith suffered 3 blows to the head which rendered him mentally incapacitate for the rest of his life. In 1876, he was committed to the Central State Hospital for the Insane in Nashville. When he died in 1923, he was the last remaining brigadier general of the Army of the Tennessee. But did you know the hauntingly handsome Confederate General Smith has made cameo appearances in several of my books?
 
Here's a description from Gatekeeper ~
 
 
Jillian froze. She could not move. She could not breathe. The ghost she had seen in her vision stood before her. Dressed in a worn and double-breasted cadet gray, thigh-length frock coat, he was nearly opaque and looked as real as a flesh-and-blood man with the exception of appearing somewhat faded. Jillian gaped. The only thing separating them was the flimsy old card table and she doubted that would stop him if it occurred to him to come any closer. Her pulse pounded relentlessly.

“What’s the matter? Cat got your tongue?” He came closer, his boots resounding on the wood floor. Spurs jingled with each step.

Jillian’s back flattened against the chair. Her breath left her lungs in an audible rush. She had glimpsed ghosts many times before but never had one been this present, this alive. She stared. But it wasn’t because of his devastatingly rakish appearance—the roughly chiseled cheekbones, straight nose and curve of his sensual lips—it was because he looked so real and because she felt a very odd sense of recognition. Still, the static charge of energy emanating from him left her with no doubt he was a ghost.
 

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Benton Smith reappears in the second Phantom Lovers book, Shadowkeeper ~
 
Jillian stood in the bathroom drying her hair with a fluffy white towel. She heard the water shut off and watched as the shower door opened and Benton stepped out, dripping and naked, onto the beige bathmat.

His dark, wavy hair was tousled carelessly about his head. Rivulets of water beaded and ran down his corded neck and muscular chest. Jillian’s breath froze when her gaze landed on the scar marring his left shoulder. He’d taken a bullet during the battle of Murfreesboro—where his brother had died. The wound had followed him even into death.
 
 
 
 

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My short story, Extra Sensual Perception, is included in the Flavors of Ecstasy I anthology. Set in Nashville, the hero lives on Benton Smith Road, a street named after the real Thomas Benton Smith. The road encircles Shy's Hill where Smith was captured during the Battle of Nashville.
 
Nashville traffic on a Friday afternoon was a bitch and when Iris finally turned onto Harding Place, she was thwarted by a long line of slow-moving drivers. Even switching on her hazard lights and honking her horn didn’t yield results.

When she ultimately arrived at Benton Smith Road, she turned and raced around the circle until she found the address. The driveway wound downward and when Iris saw a silver BMW in the garage, her heart sank.

The house looked sickeningly familiar. She’d seen it before—in her vision of his death.

Trade Paperback

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Digital Edition

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Benton Smith also makes a cameo appearance in Rebel Rose, a historical set in my home town of Florence, Alabama.
 
In October 1864, Confederate General John Bell Hood moved his twenty thousand strong Army of Tennessee through Florence Alabama on his way north to fight the battles of Franklin and Nashville.
 
Benton Smith's brigade was among them ~
 
Panic unfurled through her limbs and Rose tried to sit up but Dr. Roberts urged her back down on the pillows. “You’re not ready to get up just yet, Mrs. O’Kelley. Be still.”

Another Confederate appeared in the doorway. He looked to be about the same age as the young doctor and also surprised to see her awake. “How’s your patient?”

“She’s giving me more trouble than one of the boys, General Smith.”

The boy general’s dimples deepened with his handsome smile. “Mind the doctor, missy. He’s a good doctor. My only complaint is that he’s a little too fond of being at front for my taste.”

Digital Edition

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scarletwidow_msrHis cameo in Scarlet Widow is a bit more subtle.
 

A handsome, young officer on horseback drew up alongside the fencing. He tipped his weathered hat. “Good day, ma’am. Is this about where Major Barksdale lives?”

“Yes sir, it is,” Athena said, boldly stepping between Molly and the officer.

He nodded in polite deference to Athena. “Thank you, ma’am.”

Molly shielded her eyes from the sun as she looked up at him.

He slid out of the saddle and gave his gray horse a pat on the muzzle. “I’m Brigadier General T. B. Smith.”

“Oh yes, you’re Major Barksdale’s commanding officer,” Molly said, recognizing the name. She stopped short of mentioning the general’s youth. Everyone knew of the Twentieth Tennessee Regiment’s boy general, the youngest in the entire Army of Tennessee. In spite of his moustache and spade beard, he looked far too boyish for his command.

“At least this’un has manners,” Athena groused. She’d always been one easily swayed by a handsome face.

“Have you any word of my brother-in-law, Major Greer Barks—” Molly began, but another horse broke through the column. Greer flew out of the saddle and flung his arms around Molly.

Joyful tears sprang to her eyes, flowing freely down her cheeks and onto Greer’s tattered coat. She wanted to let loose everything she’d been holding in. Her brain tried to remind her this was temporary but she would not heed it. Not now. Not while she felt safe and protected if only for a moment.

Years of hardship, the horrors of that night the Yankees came to her house and then the gut-wrenching pain of Witt’s death poured out of her all at once. Greer held her close, apologizing for the odor of his coat, of his body. Molly didn’t care. She’d grown accustomed to the musk of damp wool, of gunpowder and unwashed bodies. At times, she wondered if life would ever go back to the way it was before the war. Then, everyone had seemed so carefree and relaxed. So genteel.

Finally she lifted her face from Greer’s chest and gazed into his hazel eyes. “Where’s…where’s Hardin?”

Greer’s expression turned grim. He glanced at his father and then at Smith.

The boy general stepped forward. His good-natured smile faded. “I regret to inform you both that Lieutenant Barksdale deserted.”

Molly gasped. “Not Hardin.”

Athena’s bottom lip protruded. “He wouldn’t dare.”

“Goddamn coward,” Hamish muttered, his words slurred.

Greer stared at his father for a moment before he bleakly shook his head. “Hardin has disgraced us all.”

“That don’t sound like my Hardin,” Athena argued. “He ain’t the easiest of you three but he ain’t no coward, neither.” Hardin had always been her favorite, despite his surly attitude.

He was difficult and obstinate. But there was no better judge of character in Maury County than Athena, and Molly had to agree with her assessment. Darkly, Molly’s thoughts turned to the last time she’d seen him. He’d sat on her bed. He’d nearly kissed her. And then he’d left her to the mercy of the most uncouth band of men she’d ever had the misfortune to meet. Damn him. “When did he desert?”

“During the summer,” Greer said.

“Smack-dab in the middle of the Atlanta campaign,” Smith added. Under his breath, he confessed, “Of course, when Johnston was replaced with Hood, we had a good many deserters.”

No wonder Hardin hadn’t wanted her to mention to anyone that she’d seen him. Still, she couldn’t wrap her brain around it. Hardin? A deserter?

Maybe he’d realized what Molly now knew. It was foolish for men to continue to die for the cause.

Digital Ebook

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For more information about the real Thomas Benton Smith, click HERE
 
 

Lover for Ransom by Debra Glass

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A New  Historical Romance Coming Soon!

Lover for Ransom

Ransom Byrne has been ravaged by guilt since an illness rendered his little sister blind. The former Confederate cavalry officer has resolved to make amends by hiring a Yankee tutor who’ll hopefully restore order to his sister’s life. Once accomplished, he’ll be free to leave Byrne’s End.

From the moment she steps off the train in Tennessee, Cathleen Ryan makes a startling first impression. With her feminist ideas, the irrepressible Bostonian quickly outrages everyone—especially Ransom. He deems the bespectacled teacher too uptight and prim for his tastes. Appearances, however, are deceiving. She tenders decadent proposals that shock and intrigue him, and sultry nights spent submitting to his every illicit request offer them both love and redemption.

But when her steadfast convictions attract the attention of dangerous men, Cathleen risks losing her chance of becoming more than just a lover for Ransom.

A Romantica® historical erotic romance from Ellora’s Cave

Read my favorite scene HERE by clicking the magnifying glass at the top right corner of the cover.

*Available March 20, 2013 wherever Ellora’s Cave Ebooks are sold

Ellora’s Cave | Amazon | B&N | ARE

Loving Locals Author Fair–Cold Water Books–Tuscumbia / February 9

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Join me and a host of other Shoals area authors at Cold Water Books in Tuscumbia, Alabama, Saturday, February 9, starting at 10:00 am.

I’ll be signing local favorites, Remembering Florence Vols. 1 and 2, Eternal, and my Skeletons in the Closet Ghost Story Collections.

 

DSC06038

Coming Soon! Lover for Ransom by Debra Glass

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I’m excited to announce that I’ve contracted a new historical romance with Ellora’s Cave. Lover for Ransom will be released wherever EC books are sold Spring 2013. **whispering** Scarlet Belles containing Bought and Paid For and Scarlet Widow might also appear in print this Spring.

Lover for Ransom

Ransom Byrne has been ravaged with guilt ever since an illness rendered his little sister blind. The former Confederate cavalry officer has resolved to make amends by hiring a tutor from up North who’ll hopefully restore order to his sister’s life. After that’s accomplished, he’ll be free to leave Byrne’s End.

From the moment she steps off the train in Thompson’s Station, Tennessee, Cathleen Ryan makes a startling first impression. With her feminist ideas, the irrepressible Bostonian quickly outrages everyone—especially Ransom. At first glimpse he deems the bespectacled teacher too uptight and prim for his tastes. Appearances, however, are deceiving. She tenders decadent proposals that shock and intrigue him, and sultry nights spent submitting to his every illicit request offer them both love and redemption. But when her steadfast convictions attract the attention of dangerous men she risks losing her chance of ever becoming more than just a lover for Ransom.

Romance Readers Author Signing With the Irrepressible Southern Sisters of Steam

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Join steamy romance writers, Naima Simone, Carla Swafford, Kerry Freeman, Kira Sinclair, and Debra Glass for an afternoon chatting about love, unbridled passion, and romance at the Patton Creek Barnes & Noble, Saturday, February 16, at 2 pm. For more information and directions, visit the B&N Event Page.

pattoncreek

Book Signing With Debra Glass and Other Authors at Huntsville Public Library

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Join Debra and a host of other Romance Authors January 26, 2013 for the Love in the Library Valentine Fair Get in the Valentine’s spirit with this festival of love! This free event includes music, giveaways, and demonstrations by chocolatiers, florists, paper craft artists, and gift-basket designers. Romance writers will read essays, meet readers, and sell and sign books. No registration is required.

Saturday, January 26, 2013

2:00-4:00 p.m.

Main Library, 915 Monroe Street, Huntsville, Alabama

Auditorium

Birmingham Public Library Local Authors Expo

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Meet me at the annual Local Authors Expo held at the Birmingham, Alabama Central Library. This event is will showcase up to 100 Alabama authors and will be held on Saturday, February 2, between 10:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. Authors will be on hand to discuss their work, sell and autograph their books, and talk about their writing process.

This year's event will feature two speakers.

Carolyn Maull McKinstry is the author of While the World Watched: A Birmingham Bombing Survivor Comes of Age During the Civil Rights Movement, a poignant and gripping eyewitness account of what it was like to grow up in the Jim Crow South. Her book covers everything from the the bombings, riots, and assassinations to the historic marches and triumphs that characterized the civil rights era. Fourteen-year-old Carolyn McKinstry was just a few feet away from a bomb, which had been planted by the Ku Klux Klan, berore it exploded at Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in September 1963. Four girls were killed. In her book, she shares how racial relations have evolved over the past five decades and gives an incredible testament to how far we've come, and how far we have yet to go. McKinstry will speak at 1 p.m. in the Arrington Auditorium.

BPL librarian and author Jared Millet will present a workshop for aspiring writers titled Show, Don't Tell: How to Breathe Life Into Your Writing. "Show, don't tell" is the most common piece of advice that beginning writers get from professionals, teachers, and industry insiders. Millet will clarify what "show, don't tell" actually means and demonstrate how to use writing to give readers a strong emotional experience. The workshop begins at 10:30 a.m. in the Arrington Auditorium.

 

Events

While the World Watched book jacketLocal Authors Expo


February 2, 2013
10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Central Library - 1st Floor
Writing Seminar
Show, Don't Tell: How to Breathe Life Into Your Writing

February 2, 2013
10:30 - 11:30 a.m.
Central Library - Arrington Auditorium
Carolyn Maull McKinstry, Author
While the World Watched: A Birmingham Bombing Survivor Comes of Age During the Civil Rights Movement

February 2, 2013
1:00 - 2:00 p.m.
Central Library - Arrington Auditorium

 

2013 Authors

@ Liberty to Speak Hearing the Word with a Spiritual Ear
Ed Abernathy Reckon Why
Frederick J. Arceneaux Mirrored
Kamenka Belton Laying at the Altar: The Ultimate Solution for Healing Sexual Trauma
Scott Blasingame The Warrior-Son
Elizabeth Bolte
Katherine Bone Duke by Day, Rogue by Night
Latonska Boswell
Jeanetta Britt W.O.O.F.: Women of Overcoming Faith
Joyce E. Brooks Self-Inflicted Overoad: Five Steps to Achieving Work-Life Balance and Becoming Your Very Best
Tahiera Brown
Jo Ann Brown Fat Tuesday: A Book About Mardi Gras
A. Bryant
Douglas Carpenter A Powerful Blessing
Harry Chambers
Gregory L. Clarke Light Will Make Rats Run
Jessie Crawford The Leroy series of children’s books
Dr. Roderick Van Daniel Notebook of Faith
Elizabeth Diaz
Enrique Diaz
Dionne Edwards Old Fashioned Recipes...Shared with Friends and Family
Alberta Felder We've Come This Far by Faith
Mary V. Freeman Incandescent
Steve Gierhart
Debra Glass Eternal
Judith Glenn
Sandra Gomez
Sybil Green
Vanessa Davis Griggs The Other Side of Dare
Emily Guido Charmeine
J. Mark Hart Fielder's Choice
Laura Hayden
Askhari Johnson Hodari
Hans Hooks
Avery Hurt
Rosanna Ingram
DeLois Jackson Faith: My Walking Cane to Glory
Raymond Jackson
Suzanne Johnson Royal Street
Jessie Jones Old Fashioned Recipes for the Soul, Your Health, Comfort and Romance
Tracy Kauffman
William F. Kelly Dangerous Passage
Deborah Brooks Langford Brooke
Helen Shores Lee The Gentle Giant of Dynamite Hill: The Untold Story of Arthur Shores and His Family’s Fight for Civil Rights
Jacqueline Lewis
Creola Lucas
John Mantooth Shoebox Train Wreck
Carolyn Maull McKinstry While the World Watched: A Birmingham Bombing Survivor Comes of Age During the Civil Rights Movement
Consuelia R. Diggs Michael Movin’ Mountains
LaQuita Middleton-Holmes Nappyminded Ideology
Jared Millet Summer Gothic: A Collection of Southern Hauntings
Jessie Miller
Shirley W. Mitchell
Mary Murphy
Adrienne Yvonne Norton The Eleventh Voice
Stephanie Osborn StarSong
Jack Owens Don’t Shoot, We’re Republicans!
Christy Reece Sweet Reward 2010 Local Authors Expo
Kimberly Richardson Tales from a Goth Librarian
Debra Eubanks Riffe Holding the Line
Myra Rutledge
Doug Segrest A Storm Came Up
Toni Shealey Lost and Turned Out
Beth Shelnutt A Life Between Light and Darkness
James Shelnutt
Lisa Shobe
Carrol Short
Annie Laura Smith
Helen P. Smith Why Be Ordinary? When You Can Be Extraordinary!!
Jennifer Stimson
Karl Heinz Strick Boy With a White Flag
Amy Leigh Strickland The Olympia Heights series
Kyle & Carly Strickland Sunshine's Night Out
Brandan Stuckey
Carla Swafford Circle of Deception
Marie Sutton
Gigi Talley
Dwayne Thompson Real Talk
Melinda Rainey Thompson I Love You – Now Hush
Skip Tucker Pale Blue Light
Clarence Watkins Baseball in Birmingham
Rick Watson Life Happens
J.D. Weeks Birmingham: Then and Now
Andrea Billingsly Whitfield What's the Black Alphabet?
Phyllis Williams
Larry Williamson Tallapoosa
NaTasha Worthy Without Parental Consent

The Local Authors Expo is presented by the Friends of the Birmingham Public Library, a nonprofit association that supports Birmingham Public Library special needs by providing volunteer and financial resources.